Grab a cheese board and a glass of wine. With so many styles of wine and cheese, it's difficult to choose what to pair. From the classic to the fun and funky, here are my favorite tips to make pairing wine with cheese a brie-s. 

Cheese and Wine Pairings

by Matt Lorman

Grab a cheese board and a glass of wine. With so many styles of wine and cheese, it's difficult to choose what to pair. From the classic to the fun and funky, here are my favorite tips to make pairing wine with cheese a brie-s. 

Goat Cheese and Sauvignon Blanc

Goat cheese and Sauvignon Blanc is a classic pairing, especially when it comes to Sancerre. Sancerre Blanc is a white wine from the Loire Valley in France that is traditionally served with local goat cheese. The reason this pairing works so well is that the acid in Sauvignon Blanc stands up to the acidity and piquant of the cheese, while the minerality of the wine also plays off the subtle minerality of the cheese. However, it is important to note that not all goat cheese is made equally. Try mixing up the style of Sauvignon Blanc depending on the style of goat cheese. Younger, fresher styles often have a grassy, herbal flavor that works wonderfully with stainless steel-fermented Sauvignon Blanc from the Loire Valley. When it comes to aged goat cheese, pairing it with a Bordeaux Blanc to take advantage of the slightly nutty flavors of the wine. 

Brie and Bubbles

Brie is a soft cow’s milk cheese that is famous for its powdery white rind and rich, creamy texture. That texture calls for a wine that can cut through all that creaminess. Look no further than a glass of bubbly! Sparkling wines such as Champagne, Cava, and Cremant usually have high acidity and a healthy stream of bubbles that cleanse the palate from cheeses that can otherwise feel heavy. Look for vintage champagnes that morph into nutty flavors with age. This will complement the earthy aroma of the cheese nicely. 

Cheddar and Malbec

Aged cheddar cheese works particularly well with a glass of Malbec from Argentina. This cheese has sharp and rich flavors which are mellowed out by the fruitiness of the wine. For simpler cheddar cheeses, consider a stainless steel-fermented wine to take advantage of the blackberry, black cherry, and juicy plum notes. For a smoked or aged cheddar, reach for Malbec that has been aged in oak. These wines have a touch of cocoa, vanilla, and baking spice that enhance the smokiness of the cheese. 

Blue Cheese and Sauternes

Blue cheese is one of the hardest cheeses to pair successfully with wine. If the wine is too light, the cheese will overpower it. Too heavy, and you can’t taste the cheese. The solution is Sauternes! This wine is made with Sauvignon Blanc, Semillon, and Muscadelle. If sweet wines aren’t your thing, think again. One sip of Sauternes with its opulent flavors of peach, apricot, and honey is enough to convert anyone into a dessert wine lover. Other great alternatives to pair with blue cheese include Tokaji, late-harvest Gewurztraminer, and Moscato d’Asti. 

Parmigiano and Lambrusco

Bring on the fizz with this next fun pairing. If you’re a fan of the sweet-and-salty sensation, this combo is for you. Parmigiano Reggiano is a crumbly, salty, and nutty cheese that just begs to be paired with something slightly sweet and fruity, like a glass of Lambrusco. Lambrusco comes in an array of colors from pale pink to deep purple, and a variety of sweetness levels. Taking a bite of cheese followed by a sip of wine makes for a fun flavor back-and-forth. Kick up your cheese pairings by making this recipe for fricos, a crunchy, baked Parmesan cheese wafer that is the adult equivalent to those cheese crackers of your childhood. 

What is your favorite wine and cheese combo? Let us know by taking to Instagram and show us your cheese board! Tag us @DCanterwines and tell us which delicious wine you are enjoying.