“What grows together, goes together!” This concept could not be more true in France, with a strong gastronomic history of pairing delicious beverages with unique foods. We’ve rounded up some tried-and-true French classics to treat yourself to.

Classic French Food & Wine Pairings

by Matt Lorman

One of my favorite food sayings is, “What grows together, goes together!” This concept could not be more true in France, with a strong gastronomic history of pairing delicious beverages with unique foods. We’ve rounded up some tried-and-true French classics to treat yourself to. Keep them in your back pocket for your next dinner party.

Muscadet and Oysters

Muscadet is a wine-producing region near the city of Nantes in the Loire Valley. Wines from this area are typically light-bodied and made from the Melon de Bourgogne grape variety. They're refreshingly high in acidity with flavors of lime, lemon, and fresh pear juice. Try them with freshly-shucked oysters with just a drizzle of lemon juice--the minerality and acidity enhances the oysters. 

Sauvignon Blanc and Goat Cheese

Sauvignon Blanc is prized for being zesty, herbaceous, and fresh. Its citrus-driven flavors and aromas stand up to the intensity of goat cheese. Look for tangier versions like Chevre or Valencay. Both the wine and cheese have acidity which complements the creaminess of the cheese nicely. 

Riesling and Tarte Flambé

Look no further than Alsace for this classic flavor combination. Tarte Flambé, also called Flammekueche, is an Alsatian specialty of crispy thin dough topped with cheese, sliced onions, and bacon lardons. The full-bodied styles of Riesling from the region are exactly what is needed to stand up to the hearty, German-influenced cuisine of the region. Try a dry Alsatian Riesling, with acidity that lightens the heartiness of the dish. 

Rosé and Bouillabaisse

Imagine sipping a chilled glass of rosé on the coast of Southern France over a nice bowl of bouillabaisse, a local seafood stew. The melange of fish, shellfish, and vegetables are pulled together by a rich broth that's made to enjoy on a summer day. This is a typical Provence dish, making it a no-brainer to pair with rosé from the same region. 

Syrah and Duck Confit

Duck confit is rich and fall-off-the-bone delicious. It needs a wine that can stand up to the richness. Syrah does just that. The flavors of purple plums, tobacco, and green peppercorns are lifted by a bright acidity and tannin structure that plays nicely with the duck. Be sure to sear it before serving to get the skin nice and crispy. 

Eager to try out these classic French pairings need assistance selecting the best wines to pair? Look no further than Concierge by DCanter for your very own on-call sommelier to help! There are so many exciting wines to try. Get started today.